Event Title

Nursing Student’s Knowledge of Alcohol-Interactive Medications

Faculty Advisor

Carolyn Jarvis

Faculty Advisor

Ann Eckhardt

Faculty Advisor

Victoria Folse

Faculty Advisor

Brad Sheese

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Room E102, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2019 11:00 AM

Description

In 2018, nearly 57% of American adults reported drinking alcohol in the past month and 41.5% also reported taking alcohol-interactive (AI) medications. Consuming alcohol and medications concurrently may result in adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a one-hour lecture about AI medications was effective in teaching a class of undergraduate nursing students (N = 50) at a small Midwestern university. The Jarvis Nursing Knowledge of Alcohol-Interactive Medications survey was distributed in August at the beginning of the semester and again 2 weeks post lecture. Students scored significantly higher on the posttest (27.47 ± 14.18 vs. 37.33 ± 16.60; p < .02). While scores increased significantly, students failed to recognize the correct medication-alcohol interaction consistently. A one-hour lecture emphasizing AI medications in the pre-licensure program enhanced students’ knowledge; however, future research is needed to determine retention of AI medication knowledge.

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Apr 13th, 10:00 AM Apr 13th, 11:00 AM

Nursing Student’s Knowledge of Alcohol-Interactive Medications

Room E102, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

In 2018, nearly 57% of American adults reported drinking alcohol in the past month and 41.5% also reported taking alcohol-interactive (AI) medications. Consuming alcohol and medications concurrently may result in adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a one-hour lecture about AI medications was effective in teaching a class of undergraduate nursing students (N = 50) at a small Midwestern university. The Jarvis Nursing Knowledge of Alcohol-Interactive Medications survey was distributed in August at the beginning of the semester and again 2 weeks post lecture. Students scored significantly higher on the posttest (27.47 ± 14.18 vs. 37.33 ± 16.60; p < .02). While scores increased significantly, students failed to recognize the correct medication-alcohol interaction consistently. A one-hour lecture emphasizing AI medications in the pre-licensure program enhanced students’ knowledge; however, future research is needed to determine retention of AI medication knowledge.