Event Title

The Truth Behind the Disability

Faculty Advisor

Jim Matthews

Graduation Year

2021

Location

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2019 11:00 AM

Description

In our society, disabilities have always been seen as detrimental ailments that keep people from integrating themselves into what we call "normalcy." However, is the disability really as problematic as we make it out to be? In this paper, I will argue that the real problem with having a disability is the negative perception that society has toward differences. I will start out by analyzing Thérèse-Adèle Husson, a young woman in nineteenth-century France who was an independent, intelligent author who also happened to be blind. I will analyze the radical views she had pertaining to the idea that disabilities are really a social construct, and people who consider themselves as non-disabled continue to reinforce this by lowering expectations and negatively perceiving their disabled counterparts. Finally, I will argue the treatment of disabled people today is not much different from Husson's experiences; thus, Husson's views may have been ahead of her time, but as time has passed, we have failed to address those views, and we must address them to create true equality.

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Apr 13th, 10:00 AM Apr 13th, 11:00 AM

The Truth Behind the Disability

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

In our society, disabilities have always been seen as detrimental ailments that keep people from integrating themselves into what we call "normalcy." However, is the disability really as problematic as we make it out to be? In this paper, I will argue that the real problem with having a disability is the negative perception that society has toward differences. I will start out by analyzing Thérèse-Adèle Husson, a young woman in nineteenth-century France who was an independent, intelligent author who also happened to be blind. I will analyze the radical views she had pertaining to the idea that disabilities are really a social construct, and people who consider themselves as non-disabled continue to reinforce this by lowering expectations and negatively perceiving their disabled counterparts. Finally, I will argue the treatment of disabled people today is not much different from Husson's experiences; thus, Husson's views may have been ahead of her time, but as time has passed, we have failed to address those views, and we must address them to create true equality.