Event Title

The Divergence Between Disability and Literature in Latin America: Examining the Lack of Disability Representation in Children’s Literature in an Othered and Stigmatized World

Faculty Advisor

Scott Sheridan

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Room E105, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2019 11:00 AM

Description

This research highlights the correlation between disability and stigmatization in Latin America in a post-UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities world. This nexus is highlighted through an interdisciplinary project combining both social sciences and the humanities by the examination of societal views, poverty, accessibility to education, Othering, and literature. How disability is handled at the educational level is a global issue, especially considering the majority of children with disabilities live in the developing world. Despite regulations presented by the UN both in its Convention and Sustainable Development Goals, governments are slow to adopt these principles into their legal framework which presents a seemingly endless cycle of prejudice and stigmatization that furthers the gap between children with disabilities and children without disabilities. While most Latin American countries agree that they should incorporate children with disabilities into their development plans, they also argue that incorporating these children is simply too expensive, and, therefore, other development goals take precedence. The lack of literature accurately representing children with disabilities in Latin America is in direct correlation to the stigmas surrounding the conditions and the oversight at the governmental level. However, research shows that the introduction of children’s literature containing diverse characters, such as children with disabilities, influences young children’s ability to empathize with peers who may appear to be different or who require special educational needs.

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Apr 13th, 10:00 AM Apr 13th, 11:00 AM

The Divergence Between Disability and Literature in Latin America: Examining the Lack of Disability Representation in Children’s Literature in an Othered and Stigmatized World

Room E105, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

This research highlights the correlation between disability and stigmatization in Latin America in a post-UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities world. This nexus is highlighted through an interdisciplinary project combining both social sciences and the humanities by the examination of societal views, poverty, accessibility to education, Othering, and literature. How disability is handled at the educational level is a global issue, especially considering the majority of children with disabilities live in the developing world. Despite regulations presented by the UN both in its Convention and Sustainable Development Goals, governments are slow to adopt these principles into their legal framework which presents a seemingly endless cycle of prejudice and stigmatization that furthers the gap between children with disabilities and children without disabilities. While most Latin American countries agree that they should incorporate children with disabilities into their development plans, they also argue that incorporating these children is simply too expensive, and, therefore, other development goals take precedence. The lack of literature accurately representing children with disabilities in Latin America is in direct correlation to the stigmas surrounding the conditions and the oversight at the governmental level. However, research shows that the introduction of children’s literature containing diverse characters, such as children with disabilities, influences young children’s ability to empathize with peers who may appear to be different or who require special educational needs.