Event Title

Karolina Pavlova: From the 19th Century Literary Salon to the Literary Canon

Faculty Advisor

Marina Balina

Graduation Year

2021

Location

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2019 12:00 PM

Description

Unrecognized during her time, Karolina Pavlova is known today as a fundamental predecessor to contemporary women’s poetry. In the nineteenth century Russia, female poets were widely excluded from the male-dominated literary field, exclusively limited to participation in literary salons and the writing of private literary albums. Pavlova, however, broke free of this gendered framework and developed her own literary voice first by translating influential texts of German Romantic poetry. Her work in translation served as a bridge into her own creative ability, which later combined male-dominated prosaic genres, with poetry, a “permitted” female form of literary expression. Unifying these two forms of creative writing in her autofiction, A Double Life, Pavlova used prose as a foundation for the narrative’s plot, and poetry as a means of conveying intimate emotion. Thus, Pavlova not only redefined gender restrictions for female creativity, but she also became an innovator in introducing Russian literature to new genre forms.

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Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

Karolina Pavlova: From the 19th Century Literary Salon to the Literary Canon

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Unrecognized during her time, Karolina Pavlova is known today as a fundamental predecessor to contemporary women’s poetry. In the nineteenth century Russia, female poets were widely excluded from the male-dominated literary field, exclusively limited to participation in literary salons and the writing of private literary albums. Pavlova, however, broke free of this gendered framework and developed her own literary voice first by translating influential texts of German Romantic poetry. Her work in translation served as a bridge into her own creative ability, which later combined male-dominated prosaic genres, with poetry, a “permitted” female form of literary expression. Unifying these two forms of creative writing in her autofiction, A Double Life, Pavlova used prose as a foundation for the narrative’s plot, and poetry as a means of conveying intimate emotion. Thus, Pavlova not only redefined gender restrictions for female creativity, but she also became an innovator in introducing Russian literature to new genre forms.