Title of Presentation or Performance

Gender Identity and Hegemony in Roman Society

Presenter and Advisor Information

Brent Baughan, Illinois Wesleyan University

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Faculty Advisor

Amanda Coles

Expected Graduation Date

2019

Location

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

4-13-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

4-13-2019 12:00 PM

Disciplines

Education

Abstract

Roman society from the early Republican period to the Flavian Imperial dynasty (509BCE-96CE) relied on a system of complete cultural dominance of masculine actors to promote and maintain patriarchy, a process the Italian political theorist Gramsci calls hegemony. This paper argues that Roman men propagated ideal gender norms and socially ostracized men and violently punished women and intersex people for deviating from those norms, by analyzing literary and epigraphic treatments of gender from the period. Other scholars take Roman patriarchy as existing for its own sake or that it was innately part of the Roman state apparatus, while in reality it was a constructed system which required constant maintenance. Revealing the consequences of deviation within such a consistently reinforced system is a new direction for scholars of Roman society.

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Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

Gender Identity and Hegemony in Roman Society

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Roman society from the early Republican period to the Flavian Imperial dynasty (509BCE-96CE) relied on a system of complete cultural dominance of masculine actors to promote and maintain patriarchy, a process the Italian political theorist Gramsci calls hegemony. This paper argues that Roman men propagated ideal gender norms and socially ostracized men and violently punished women and intersex people for deviating from those norms, by analyzing literary and epigraphic treatments of gender from the period. Other scholars take Roman patriarchy as existing for its own sake or that it was innately part of the Roman state apparatus, while in reality it was a constructed system which required constant maintenance. Revealing the consequences of deviation within such a consistently reinforced system is a new direction for scholars of Roman society.