Title of Presentation or Performance

Ingestion and assimilation of dissolved organic matter by feeding larvae of the families Chaetopteridae, Magelonidae, Polygordiidae, Sabellariidae, and Spionida (Annelida) and the Sipuncula.

Presenter and Advisor Information

Seth Borrowman, Illinois Wesleyan University

Type of Submission

Poster

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Area of Study or Work

Biology

Faculty Advisor

Will Jaeckle

Expected Graduation Date

2019

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2019 10:00 AM

Disciplines

Education

Abstract

The life history of many marine invertebrates includes a free-living larval stage that must acquire food. These planktonic larvae live in an environment where the abundance of particulate foods (1-20 μm) is low and have evolved a diversity of feeding methods. Larvae are also exposed to dissolved organic materials (DOM) which may be a source of nutrition. We tested the hypothesis that feeding larvae of Polychaeta and Sipuncula are able to ingest seawater and that the cells lining the gut then assimilate DOM. Larvae were collected from Ft. Pierce, FL. Specimens were exposed to an iron-containing protein (ferritin) or polysaccharide (iron-dextran); experimental controls were not exposed to an iron-containing molecule. Iron in larvae was detected using the "Prussian Blue" reaction and the presence and distribution of the blue product was examined using light microscopy. In all examined larvae we found the blue label within the gut lumen, but not within the cells lining the digestive system, and control specimens lacked blue color. These results suggest that these larvae ingest seawater, delivering DOM into the digestive system, but do not support the hypothesis that DOM is a nutritional source. Further work is necessary to describe digestion in polychaete and sipunculan larvae.

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Apr 13th, 9:00 AM Apr 13th, 10:00 AM

Ingestion and assimilation of dissolved organic matter by feeding larvae of the families Chaetopteridae, Magelonidae, Polygordiidae, Sabellariidae, and Spionida (Annelida) and the Sipuncula.

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

The life history of many marine invertebrates includes a free-living larval stage that must acquire food. These planktonic larvae live in an environment where the abundance of particulate foods (1-20 μm) is low and have evolved a diversity of feeding methods. Larvae are also exposed to dissolved organic materials (DOM) which may be a source of nutrition. We tested the hypothesis that feeding larvae of Polychaeta and Sipuncula are able to ingest seawater and that the cells lining the gut then assimilate DOM. Larvae were collected from Ft. Pierce, FL. Specimens were exposed to an iron-containing protein (ferritin) or polysaccharide (iron-dextran); experimental controls were not exposed to an iron-containing molecule. Iron in larvae was detected using the "Prussian Blue" reaction and the presence and distribution of the blue product was examined using light microscopy. In all examined larvae we found the blue label within the gut lumen, but not within the cells lining the digestive system, and control specimens lacked blue color. These results suggest that these larvae ingest seawater, delivering DOM into the digestive system, but do not support the hypothesis that DOM is a nutritional source. Further work is necessary to describe digestion in polychaete and sipunculan larvae.