Title of Presentation

On the Nature of Synesthesia: A Learned Association or Something More?

Type of Submission

Event

Faculty Advisor

Jason Themanson

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2019 10:00 AM

Disciplines

Education

Abstract

Synesthesia is a phenomenon that has captivated the interest of many researchers, as it is a unique experience of the blending of the senses. The following study was conducted in an effort to understand whether synesthetic experiences can be learned, as a 2014 paper claimed. While there has been much research demonstrating that synesthesia is more common than previously thought, and likely to develop in young children as a learning mechanism, the amount of available event-related brain potential (ERP) studies on synesthesia are much less available. The current study, utilizes pre- and post-test ERP data from participants to understand whether a learned association or synesthetic experience occurred during the 4 weeks of training on letter-color and music-color association task. The difference between the pre- and post-ERP tests was analyzed to determine if such training altered three specific ERP components believed to resemble the ERP of synesthetes.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 9:00 AM Apr 13th, 10:00 AM

On the Nature of Synesthesia: A Learned Association or Something More?

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Synesthesia is a phenomenon that has captivated the interest of many researchers, as it is a unique experience of the blending of the senses. The following study was conducted in an effort to understand whether synesthetic experiences can be learned, as a 2014 paper claimed. While there has been much research demonstrating that synesthesia is more common than previously thought, and likely to develop in young children as a learning mechanism, the amount of available event-related brain potential (ERP) studies on synesthesia are much less available. The current study, utilizes pre- and post-test ERP data from participants to understand whether a learned association or synesthetic experience occurred during the 4 weeks of training on letter-color and music-color association task. The difference between the pre- and post-ERP tests was analyzed to determine if such training altered three specific ERP components believed to resemble the ERP of synesthetes.