Title of Presentation or Performance

Generating Ultrasonic Acoustic Holograms with Circular Arrays

Presenter and Advisor Information

Paul Johnson, Illinois Wesleyan University

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Faculty Advisor

Gabe Spalding

Expected Graduation Date

2019

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

4-13-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-13-2019 10:00 AM

Disciplines

Education

Abstract

Acoustic holograms are formed by interfering multiple sonic sources of identical frequency and differing phase. By using ultrasonic transducers, 3D printed arrays, it is possible to computer generate holographic arrays at 40 kHz in different configurations. Various algorithms can then be used to model three-dimensional geometries generated from the fourier transform of the phase delays of the array. By using circular arrays, I am able to explore vortex generation in an ultrasonic environment with a cost-effective desktop setup. These holograms can be measured and plotted using another transceiver attached to an X-Y plotter. This work demonstrates how to build and control this set-up, and opens up the ability to do research with ultrasonic holograms by future students. I show how to both control and measure a hologram through a LabVIEW environment, and suggest points of optimization for future more powerful arrays.

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Apr 13th, 9:00 AM Apr 13th, 10:00 AM

Generating Ultrasonic Acoustic Holograms with Circular Arrays

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Acoustic holograms are formed by interfering multiple sonic sources of identical frequency and differing phase. By using ultrasonic transducers, 3D printed arrays, it is possible to computer generate holographic arrays at 40 kHz in different configurations. Various algorithms can then be used to model three-dimensional geometries generated from the fourier transform of the phase delays of the array. By using circular arrays, I am able to explore vortex generation in an ultrasonic environment with a cost-effective desktop setup. These holograms can be measured and plotted using another transceiver attached to an X-Y plotter. This work demonstrates how to build and control this set-up, and opens up the ability to do research with ultrasonic holograms by future students. I show how to both control and measure a hologram through a LabVIEW environment, and suggest points of optimization for future more powerful arrays.