Event Title

Accuracy and Precision of a Custom Instrument that Studies Cosmic Analog Dusts

Faculty Advisor

Thushara Perera

Graduation Year

2021

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

13-4-2019 3:00 PM

Description

A custom instrument has been designed and built to study cosmic analog dusts in the laboratory. Two successful data acquisition runs have been conducted with the novel instrument thus far. But data is only as precise/accurate as the instruments that acquire it. An examination on the resolution and accuracy of our instrument is presented. For this purpose, we first analyzed the data acquired prior to purging water vapor from the instrument in order utilize water spectral lines that are present at the frequencies 556 GHz and 752 GHz. Secondly, using a CNC milling machine, we constructed a thick-grill, high-pass filter out of brass, which has a sharp transmission turn-on at 216 GHz, and obtained spectra with and without it. All three of these spectral features have been used to assess the accuracy and resolution of our instrument.

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Apr 13th, 2:00 PM Apr 13th, 3:00 PM

Accuracy and Precision of a Custom Instrument that Studies Cosmic Analog Dusts

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

A custom instrument has been designed and built to study cosmic analog dusts in the laboratory. Two successful data acquisition runs have been conducted with the novel instrument thus far. But data is only as precise/accurate as the instruments that acquire it. An examination on the resolution and accuracy of our instrument is presented. For this purpose, we first analyzed the data acquired prior to purging water vapor from the instrument in order utilize water spectral lines that are present at the frequencies 556 GHz and 752 GHz. Secondly, using a CNC milling machine, we constructed a thick-grill, high-pass filter out of brass, which has a sharp transmission turn-on at 216 GHz, and obtained spectra with and without it. All three of these spectral features have been used to assess the accuracy and resolution of our instrument.