Faculty Advisor

Brian Walter

Graduation Year

2020

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

13-4-2019 3:00 PM

Description

The order Characiformes is split into two major suborders; Characoidei and Citharinoidei, and includes over 2,000 different species of ray-finned fish, including a variety of Tetras often found in pet stores. Members are identified by the adipose fin, a small fin between the dorsal fin and tail. Of the ~1,800 species found in South America, ~1,100 are within the family Characidae (as defined by the lack of the supraorbital bone) with remaining species spread among 13 other families. Defining phylogenetic relationships among and within each family has proven to be challenging, as a result, the evolutionary relationships between these families and their proper classification remain unclear.

This project involves investigating the major distinctive anatomical and morphological differences and similarities between three families of the suborder Characoidei; Characidae, Lebiasinidae, and Gasteropelecidae. A comparative analysis of adult anatomy and morphology was carried out using: (1) morphometric analysis, which utilizes technology, such as image analysis, to detect quantitative characteristics within groups, and (2) quantification of various meristic features of the skeletal anatomy following staining. This research has the intention of contributing knowledge to what is already existent in the efforts to clearly describe the relationship between these families in an anatomical manner.

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Apr 13th, 2:00 PM Apr 13th, 3:00 PM

Investigation of the Shared and Divergent Anatomical Features of Fishes From the Suborder Characoidei

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

The order Characiformes is split into two major suborders; Characoidei and Citharinoidei, and includes over 2,000 different species of ray-finned fish, including a variety of Tetras often found in pet stores. Members are identified by the adipose fin, a small fin between the dorsal fin and tail. Of the ~1,800 species found in South America, ~1,100 are within the family Characidae (as defined by the lack of the supraorbital bone) with remaining species spread among 13 other families. Defining phylogenetic relationships among and within each family has proven to be challenging, as a result, the evolutionary relationships between these families and their proper classification remain unclear.

This project involves investigating the major distinctive anatomical and morphological differences and similarities between three families of the suborder Characoidei; Characidae, Lebiasinidae, and Gasteropelecidae. A comparative analysis of adult anatomy and morphology was carried out using: (1) morphometric analysis, which utilizes technology, such as image analysis, to detect quantitative characteristics within groups, and (2) quantification of various meristic features of the skeletal anatomy following staining. This research has the intention of contributing knowledge to what is already existent in the efforts to clearly describe the relationship between these families in an anatomical manner.