Title of Presentation or Performance

Harboring Hartney: Making A Splash In Cluster B

Type of Submission

Poster

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Area of Study or Work

Biology

Faculty Advisor

Richard Alvey and David Bollivar

Expected Graduation Date

2022

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

13-4-2019 3:00 PM

Disciplines

Education

Abstract

Bacteriophages, which are viruses, have the ability to infect numerous species of bacteria and are the most diverse biological entities on Earth, as roughly 10 31 exist. The discovery and sequencing of DNA from the newly discovered Rhodobacter capsulatus bacteriophage, Hartney, is used to further advance our understanding of the diversity of bacteriophages. Hartney was isolated from the Illinois River in Morris, Illinois. Hartney was obtained through enrichment and amplified. The genome was sequenced at NC State University and assembled at IWU to determine that Hartney belonged in Cluster B, which shows relation to Titan, Spartan, and Thunderbird. The tail and capsid sizes were determined through the use of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis at Indiana University. This analysis revealed that the tail size is 134 nanometers and the capsid diameter is 64 nanometers. The measurements indicate that the phage is a siphoviridae. Annotation of this phage was done using Genemark, Starterator, PECAAN, and Glimmer to determine the genes present. Once completed, these results will be submitted to GenBank.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 2:00 PM Apr 13th, 3:00 PM

Harboring Hartney: Making A Splash In Cluster B

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Bacteriophages, which are viruses, have the ability to infect numerous species of bacteria and are the most diverse biological entities on Earth, as roughly 10 31 exist. The discovery and sequencing of DNA from the newly discovered Rhodobacter capsulatus bacteriophage, Hartney, is used to further advance our understanding of the diversity of bacteriophages. Hartney was isolated from the Illinois River in Morris, Illinois. Hartney was obtained through enrichment and amplified. The genome was sequenced at NC State University and assembled at IWU to determine that Hartney belonged in Cluster B, which shows relation to Titan, Spartan, and Thunderbird. The tail and capsid sizes were determined through the use of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis at Indiana University. This analysis revealed that the tail size is 134 nanometers and the capsid diameter is 64 nanometers. The measurements indicate that the phage is a siphoviridae. Annotation of this phage was done using Genemark, Starterator, PECAAN, and Glimmer to determine the genes present. Once completed, these results will be submitted to GenBank.