Event Title

Scanning Single Photon Detector Implementation of Quantum “Ghost Imaging”

Faculty Advisor

Gabriel C. Spalding

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

13-4-2019 3:00 PM

Description

Entangled photons can be exploited for single-photon imaging: photons are accumulated one by one to form an image on a camera. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, one can use “heralded imaging,” where camera data is only accepted if a partner (entangled) photon is detected in coincidence, at a second detector. A secondary consequence of the strong correlations between entangled photons is that we can place the object into the path of the second detector, and yet still create an image on the original camera, using only photons that never interacted with the viewed object. This configuration is called “ghost imaging.” To reduce cost, we designed and implemented a modified version, replacing the fast-gated camera with single-photon sensitivity with a single-pixel detector that scans the image plane. Our design had to carefully preserve optical alignment so that the detector is always pointing at the source of entangled photons. Our next step will be to use ghost diffraction to demonstrate that entangled phone pairs are correlated in ways that extend beyond what is allowed by classical physics.

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Apr 13th, 2:00 PM Apr 13th, 3:00 PM

Scanning Single Photon Detector Implementation of Quantum “Ghost Imaging”

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Entangled photons can be exploited for single-photon imaging: photons are accumulated one by one to form an image on a camera. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, one can use “heralded imaging,” where camera data is only accepted if a partner (entangled) photon is detected in coincidence, at a second detector. A secondary consequence of the strong correlations between entangled photons is that we can place the object into the path of the second detector, and yet still create an image on the original camera, using only photons that never interacted with the viewed object. This configuration is called “ghost imaging.” To reduce cost, we designed and implemented a modified version, replacing the fast-gated camera with single-photon sensitivity with a single-pixel detector that scans the image plane. Our design had to carefully preserve optical alignment so that the detector is always pointing at the source of entangled photons. Our next step will be to use ghost diffraction to demonstrate that entangled phone pairs are correlated in ways that extend beyond what is allowed by classical physics.