Event Title

Optical Fourier Analysis Using a DMD

Faculty Advisor

Gabe Spalding

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

13-4-2019 3:00 PM

Description

What Fourier analysis does is to deconstruct complex functions into simpler component segments that are periodic. This project is designed to conduct Fourier analysis optically, using a 4f imaging system, where the back focal plane is related to the front focal plane via a complex Fourier transform (sensitive to both the amplitude and phase of each periodic component). Through computer control of a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD), we are able to flexibily apply different patterns to manipulate the input light waves and, at the same time, examine the result in the back focal plane. A camera placed in that plane allows for quantitative analysis, via image analysis. In this poster, we will describe the challenges involved, the progress attained, and suggestions for future work along these lines.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 2:00 PM Apr 13th, 3:00 PM

Optical Fourier Analysis Using a DMD

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

What Fourier analysis does is to deconstruct complex functions into simpler component segments that are periodic. This project is designed to conduct Fourier analysis optically, using a 4f imaging system, where the back focal plane is related to the front focal plane via a complex Fourier transform (sensitive to both the amplitude and phase of each periodic component). Through computer control of a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD), we are able to flexibily apply different patterns to manipulate the input light waves and, at the same time, examine the result in the back focal plane. A camera placed in that plane allows for quantitative analysis, via image analysis. In this poster, we will describe the challenges involved, the progress attained, and suggestions for future work along these lines.