Event Title

The Economic Assimilation of Young Southern European Immigrants in the United States’ Labor Market

Presenter Information

Christopher Sawicki, Illinois wes

Faculty Advisor

Michael Seeborg

Graduation Year

2020

Location

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

4-4-2020 10:45 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 11:00 AM

Description

Over the past few decades, youth unemployment levels have reached all-time highs in Southern Europe. The question arises: Do Southern European youth immigrants fare better in the U.S. labor market? This study is aimed to explore the assimilation of youth immigrants from Portugal, Italy, Greece, and Spain when compared to US native youth. By analyzing differences in wages and employment, I aim to determine how well this sample of immigrants have assimilated in the United States and whether they may better off in the United States. Human capital theory suggests that since not all immigrant skills can be applied in the United States, natives will perform better than immigrants. This paper uses regression analysis and the American Community Survey (ACS) database to test the hypothesis that Southern European youth immigrants to the U.S. will have lower earnings than U.S. native youth. Surprisingly, the results suggest that youth immigrants from these four countries seem more likely to assimilate in terms of wages and have a higher probability of employment than young U.S. natives.

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Apr 4th, 10:45 AM Apr 4th, 11:00 AM

The Economic Assimilation of Young Southern European Immigrants in the United States’ Labor Market

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Over the past few decades, youth unemployment levels have reached all-time highs in Southern Europe. The question arises: Do Southern European youth immigrants fare better in the U.S. labor market? This study is aimed to explore the assimilation of youth immigrants from Portugal, Italy, Greece, and Spain when compared to US native youth. By analyzing differences in wages and employment, I aim to determine how well this sample of immigrants have assimilated in the United States and whether they may better off in the United States. Human capital theory suggests that since not all immigrant skills can be applied in the United States, natives will perform better than immigrants. This paper uses regression analysis and the American Community Survey (ACS) database to test the hypothesis that Southern European youth immigrants to the U.S. will have lower earnings than U.S. native youth. Surprisingly, the results suggest that youth immigrants from these four countries seem more likely to assimilate in terms of wages and have a higher probability of employment than young U.S. natives.