Event Title

Man’s Best Friend at the Center of an Ecological Crisis: Analyzing the concentration of dog populations and discovering local opinions in the Northern Andes of Angochagua, Ecuador

Faculty Advisor

William Jaeckle

Graduation Year

2021

Location

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

4-4-2020 11:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 11:15 AM

Description

Known as loyal companions in domestic settings, dogs (Canus lupus familiaris) also assume a variety of roles in ecological communities, and, in Northern Ecuador, free-ranging dogs have forced some endemic fauna out of their habitats. The Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus), native to Ecuador, is considered a “Vulnerable” species (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species). Andean bears inhabit the region surrounding the rural community of Angochagua, Imbabura, Ecuador, and may interact with dogs associated with Angochagua. To understand the relationship between dogs, community members, and Andean bears, I contributed to a government census by interviewing 50 households and reviewing data from 288 households to estimate the pet population densities and document opinions about dogs and Andean bears. In parallel, 5 camera traps were reviewed to determine relationships between bear, dog, and human presence. Many subjects expressed that dogs were a greater threat than bears, while others stated that bears were more dangerous. Photographs from camera traps revealed that dogs, bears, and people traveled through the same locations and could potentially interact. Since this study, conservation efforts to study Andean bears have been completed, while programs providing affordable care and education to dog owners have continued through the Ministry of Public Health.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 4th, 11:00 AM Apr 4th, 11:15 AM

Man’s Best Friend at the Center of an Ecological Crisis: Analyzing the concentration of dog populations and discovering local opinions in the Northern Andes of Angochagua, Ecuador

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Known as loyal companions in domestic settings, dogs (Canus lupus familiaris) also assume a variety of roles in ecological communities, and, in Northern Ecuador, free-ranging dogs have forced some endemic fauna out of their habitats. The Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus), native to Ecuador, is considered a “Vulnerable” species (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species). Andean bears inhabit the region surrounding the rural community of Angochagua, Imbabura, Ecuador, and may interact with dogs associated with Angochagua. To understand the relationship between dogs, community members, and Andean bears, I contributed to a government census by interviewing 50 households and reviewing data from 288 households to estimate the pet population densities and document opinions about dogs and Andean bears. In parallel, 5 camera traps were reviewed to determine relationships between bear, dog, and human presence. Many subjects expressed that dogs were a greater threat than bears, while others stated that bears were more dangerous. Photographs from camera traps revealed that dogs, bears, and people traveled through the same locations and could potentially interact. Since this study, conservation efforts to study Andean bears have been completed, while programs providing affordable care and education to dog owners have continued through the Ministry of Public Health.