Event Title

Corresponding with Keats: A Tragedy in Five Acts

Faculty Advisor

Michael Theune

Graduation Year

2020

Location

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

4-4-2020 11:30 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 11:45 AM

Description

In recent decades, key scholarship and projects have affirmed—at long last—the importance and independent literary quality of John Keats’s personal correspondence. And while creative endeavors like Tom Clark’s Junkets on a Sad Planet have further engaged Keats’s remarkable letters, none have gone so far as to audaciously assume a personal acquaintanceship with the long-dead Romantic. Uniquely processing a personal trauma which echoes Keats’s biography in numerous, intriguing ways, Corresponding with Keats: A Tragedy in Five Acts does just that. Communicating a semi-autobiographical narrative via a prose-poem and accompanying analytical reflection, this project uses Keats’s letters—specifically, his lengthy September, 1819, journal letter to George and Georgiana Keats—as a template and, with the necessary casualness of someone who has—in reality—voyeuristically probed the writer’s many revealing letters, is addressed directly, intimately, and improbably to John Keats himself.

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Apr 4th, 11:30 AM Apr 4th, 11:45 AM

Corresponding with Keats: A Tragedy in Five Acts

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

In recent decades, key scholarship and projects have affirmed—at long last—the importance and independent literary quality of John Keats’s personal correspondence. And while creative endeavors like Tom Clark’s Junkets on a Sad Planet have further engaged Keats’s remarkable letters, none have gone so far as to audaciously assume a personal acquaintanceship with the long-dead Romantic. Uniquely processing a personal trauma which echoes Keats’s biography in numerous, intriguing ways, Corresponding with Keats: A Tragedy in Five Acts does just that. Communicating a semi-autobiographical narrative via a prose-poem and accompanying analytical reflection, this project uses Keats’s letters—specifically, his lengthy September, 1819, journal letter to George and Georgiana Keats—as a template and, with the necessary casualness of someone who has—in reality—voyeuristically probed the writer’s many revealing letters, is addressed directly, intimately, and improbably to John Keats himself.