Event Title

Arts Integration and Student Engagement

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2020

Location

Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

4-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 10:00 AM

Description

One of the most crucial parts of education is making sure your students are engaged. Student engagement is characterized as having three facets: behavioral, emotional, and cognitive engagement. Additionally, student engagement is often linked with academic achievement; i.e. higher engagement often leads to higher academic achievement (Kearsley & Schneiderman, 1998). The purpose of this study was to investigate how cross-curricular arts integration impacted student engagement. Arts-integration is the practice of using art forms to teach concepts unrelated to the arts. This study took place in a classroom with 34 students, all in 4th grade. I taught a series of lessons in different content areas that all included arts-integration. After each lesson, I collected student feedback on how they enjoyed the lesson and kept a running record of my own observations of students and their engagement during the various forms of arts integration. I found that integrating the arts into the curriculum led to positive trends in student’s engagement. These findings are consistent with other studies that have been conducted on similar topics.

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Apr 4th, 9:00 AM Apr 4th, 10:00 AM

Arts Integration and Student Engagement

Center for Natural Sciences

One of the most crucial parts of education is making sure your students are engaged. Student engagement is characterized as having three facets: behavioral, emotional, and cognitive engagement. Additionally, student engagement is often linked with academic achievement; i.e. higher engagement often leads to higher academic achievement (Kearsley & Schneiderman, 1998). The purpose of this study was to investigate how cross-curricular arts integration impacted student engagement. Arts-integration is the practice of using art forms to teach concepts unrelated to the arts. This study took place in a classroom with 34 students, all in 4th grade. I taught a series of lessons in different content areas that all included arts-integration. After each lesson, I collected student feedback on how they enjoyed the lesson and kept a running record of my own observations of students and their engagement during the various forms of arts integration. I found that integrating the arts into the curriculum led to positive trends in student’s engagement. These findings are consistent with other studies that have been conducted on similar topics.