Event Title

Adaptation for International Students in the United States: Factors and Implications

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2020

Location

Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

4-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 10:00 AM

Description

In 2018 to 2019, the total number of international students in the United States has reached 1,095,299, counting for 5.5% of the entire student population in U.S. higher education institutions (Institute of International Education, 2019). Along with the growing number of populations, increasing number of studies aims to examine international students’ adaptation processes. However, existing literature focus more on the predictors and factors of the students’ adaptation, but less on the implementation and intervention programs. The purpose of this research synthesis is to examine the convergent findings in the current literature on the potential factors that affect international students’ psychosocial adaptation, as well as evaluate programs and strategies provided by institutions in the United States. Research studies are selected based on topic relevance and date of publication. Results suggest that interpersonal communication, academic performance, social support, length of residency and language proficiency play significant roles in students’ success of sociocultural adaptation. Meanwhile, students’ self-esteem condition, satisfaction with life in the U.S. and perceived psychological distress affect their psychological adaptation pathway. Further implications and recommendations were also discussed based on the findings.

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Apr 4th, 9:00 AM Apr 4th, 10:00 AM

Adaptation for International Students in the United States: Factors and Implications

Center for Natural Sciences

In 2018 to 2019, the total number of international students in the United States has reached 1,095,299, counting for 5.5% of the entire student population in U.S. higher education institutions (Institute of International Education, 2019). Along with the growing number of populations, increasing number of studies aims to examine international students’ adaptation processes. However, existing literature focus more on the predictors and factors of the students’ adaptation, but less on the implementation and intervention programs. The purpose of this research synthesis is to examine the convergent findings in the current literature on the potential factors that affect international students’ psychosocial adaptation, as well as evaluate programs and strategies provided by institutions in the United States. Research studies are selected based on topic relevance and date of publication. Results suggest that interpersonal communication, academic performance, social support, length of residency and language proficiency play significant roles in students’ success of sociocultural adaptation. Meanwhile, students’ self-esteem condition, satisfaction with life in the U.S. and perceived psychological distress affect their psychological adaptation pathway. Further implications and recommendations were also discussed based on the findings.