Event Title

Feedback-Processing during Speeded-Response Tasks: Expertise Effects on Performance

Faculty Advisor

Jason Themanson

Graduation Year

2020

Location

Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

4-4-2020 2:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2020 3:00 PM

Description

With the objective of assessing neural activity during baseball performances, 14 novices who were considered non-baseball players and 14 experts with ongoing collegiate level experience were tested. Each participant completed a computerized task that had them determine between different types of pitches to assess whether the pitch was a ball or a strike. All pitches presented during this task were considered borderline pitches, making it hard to distinguish between them. After each pitch, the participant was given immediate feedback, displaying the accuracy of their answer. Throughout the given task, the participants were hooked up to an EEG in order to measure their neural activity. The relationship between collegiate-level players and their neural activity to feedback, pitches and performance, were found to be significant. However, this was not significant within the novice group. This suggests that the expert group more frequently was able to change their performance based on past feedback. It was shown that this group learned from both their incorrect and correct responses. Ultimately, determining that expertise has an effect on cognitive processing during baseball. Researching this level of psychological data could prove to be advantageous to teams who participate in performance modeling, player development plans, and evaluations.

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Apr 4th, 2:00 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

Feedback-Processing during Speeded-Response Tasks: Expertise Effects on Performance

Center for Natural Sciences

With the objective of assessing neural activity during baseball performances, 14 novices who were considered non-baseball players and 14 experts with ongoing collegiate level experience were tested. Each participant completed a computerized task that had them determine between different types of pitches to assess whether the pitch was a ball or a strike. All pitches presented during this task were considered borderline pitches, making it hard to distinguish between them. After each pitch, the participant was given immediate feedback, displaying the accuracy of their answer. Throughout the given task, the participants were hooked up to an EEG in order to measure their neural activity. The relationship between collegiate-level players and their neural activity to feedback, pitches and performance, were found to be significant. However, this was not significant within the novice group. This suggests that the expert group more frequently was able to change their performance based on past feedback. It was shown that this group learned from both their incorrect and correct responses. Ultimately, determining that expertise has an effect on cognitive processing during baseball. Researching this level of psychological data could prove to be advantageous to teams who participate in performance modeling, player development plans, and evaluations.