Event Title

A computational approach to the study of Ultralow field reversal of two-body magnetization

Faculty Advisor

Narendra Jaggi

Graduation Year

2022

Location

Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

4-4-2020 2:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2020 3:00 PM

Description

Field-induced magnetization reversal has been thoroughly used for information storage in hard-disks, magnetic memory, and logic devices. Here, we observe the magnetization reversal of two spherical nanoparticles, also called Stoner particles. We used a GPU-accelerated micromagnetic simulation software called mumax3 to study the magnetic switching of these particles at a separation distance that is perpendicular to the anisotropy axes. The external field is applied antiparallel to the anisotropy axes. We have studied the magnetic switching for different values of separation distances, and we observe a general decrease in the external field required for switching as the distance decreases. However, at a critical distance of 23nm, we observed an ultralow magnetic switching field strength. Then the field increases sharply. Our simulations show a general trend that agrees to the data. Work is still in progress to study the magnetic switching of Stoner particles of varied geometry.

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Apr 4th, 2:00 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

A computational approach to the study of Ultralow field reversal of two-body magnetization

Center for Natural Sciences

Field-induced magnetization reversal has been thoroughly used for information storage in hard-disks, magnetic memory, and logic devices. Here, we observe the magnetization reversal of two spherical nanoparticles, also called Stoner particles. We used a GPU-accelerated micromagnetic simulation software called mumax3 to study the magnetic switching of these particles at a separation distance that is perpendicular to the anisotropy axes. The external field is applied antiparallel to the anisotropy axes. We have studied the magnetic switching for different values of separation distances, and we observe a general decrease in the external field required for switching as the distance decreases. However, at a critical distance of 23nm, we observed an ultralow magnetic switching field strength. Then the field increases sharply. Our simulations show a general trend that agrees to the data. Work is still in progress to study the magnetic switching of Stoner particles of varied geometry.