Event Title

Examining the Implications of Acculturation on Body Image Ideals and Dissatisfaction: A Systematic Literature Review

Faculty Advisor

Marie Nebel-Schwalm

Graduation Year

2021

Location

Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

4-4-2020 2:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2020 3:00 PM

Description

Although Caucasian groups predominate the literature on body dissatisfaction and eating pathology, individuals of all ethnicities are impacted by these maladaptive features (Levinson & Brosof, 2016). Also, there is growing evidence that one’s racial and ethnic identification differentially impacts one’s body dissatisfaction (Rakhkovskaya & Warren, 2016; Yu & Perez, 2019), studies on disordered eating routinely omit measures of ethnic identification and acculturation. The current review examines the gaps in the literature regarding the impact of culture on eating pathology and body image. Findings suggest that, although researchers have identified key predictors of eating pathology, the degree to which these factors influence outcomes among non-Caucasians is less clear. Clinicians must avoid the temptation to assume that the existing conceptual framework equally applies to all populations. Further, within-group variation of ethnic identification is an important consideration when conducting cross-cultural comparisons (Guan, Lee, & Cole, 2012). Causal clarification is needed to better understand the influence of racial and ethnic factors on body image and eating pathology.

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Apr 4th, 2:00 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

Examining the Implications of Acculturation on Body Image Ideals and Dissatisfaction: A Systematic Literature Review

Center for Natural Sciences

Although Caucasian groups predominate the literature on body dissatisfaction and eating pathology, individuals of all ethnicities are impacted by these maladaptive features (Levinson & Brosof, 2016). Also, there is growing evidence that one’s racial and ethnic identification differentially impacts one’s body dissatisfaction (Rakhkovskaya & Warren, 2016; Yu & Perez, 2019), studies on disordered eating routinely omit measures of ethnic identification and acculturation. The current review examines the gaps in the literature regarding the impact of culture on eating pathology and body image. Findings suggest that, although researchers have identified key predictors of eating pathology, the degree to which these factors influence outcomes among non-Caucasians is less clear. Clinicians must avoid the temptation to assume that the existing conceptual framework equally applies to all populations. Further, within-group variation of ethnic identification is an important consideration when conducting cross-cultural comparisons (Guan, Lee, & Cole, 2012). Causal clarification is needed to better understand the influence of racial and ethnic factors on body image and eating pathology.