Title of Presentation

Social Emotional Learning in the Socially Distant Classroom

Type of Submission

Synchronous Research Talk

Research Field

Educational Studies

Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85138860792?pwd=VVFMcEJuenBhcUt2K1QvSVhBZmU1UT09

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2021

Start Date

10-4-2021 10:00 AM

End Date

10-4-2021 10:15 AM

Abstract

The importance of solid, foundational Social Emotional Learning (SEL) for students of all ages is growing in relevance, especially since COVID-19 has seen so many children forced to learn from home without direct peer and teacher interaction. SEL is defined as, “The process of acquiring core competencies to recognize and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, appreciate the perspectives of others, establish and maintain positive relationships, make responsible decisions, and handle interpersonal situations constructively” (Durlak et al., 2011, p. 406). SEL ties into the engagement section of the Universal Design for Learning framework which states that for children to learn best, they must be in an environment that facilitates proper coping skills, guides personal reflection, fosters a collaborative community, and is threat-free (CAST, 2018). Since all students are different, incorporating intentional SEL activities into everyday curriculum gets a classroom one step further to being able to accommodate intellectual and social differences, just as the Universal Design for Learning suggests. In this classroom research, I evaluate various SEL strategies that I presented to 15 third-graders during my student teaching. I presented SEL lessons to the full class and collected and analyzed data such as environmental artifacts, classroom observations, and student work in the form of various surveys, email correspondence, and assignment submissions. The relevance of this study reaches beyond the classroom and into the world of child care in general, as Social Emotional Learning acts as the foundational stepping stone in getting children ready to function in the adult world.

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Apr 10th, 10:00 AM Apr 10th, 10:15 AM

Social Emotional Learning in the Socially Distant Classroom

The importance of solid, foundational Social Emotional Learning (SEL) for students of all ages is growing in relevance, especially since COVID-19 has seen so many children forced to learn from home without direct peer and teacher interaction. SEL is defined as, “The process of acquiring core competencies to recognize and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, appreciate the perspectives of others, establish and maintain positive relationships, make responsible decisions, and handle interpersonal situations constructively” (Durlak et al., 2011, p. 406). SEL ties into the engagement section of the Universal Design for Learning framework which states that for children to learn best, they must be in an environment that facilitates proper coping skills, guides personal reflection, fosters a collaborative community, and is threat-free (CAST, 2018). Since all students are different, incorporating intentional SEL activities into everyday curriculum gets a classroom one step further to being able to accommodate intellectual and social differences, just as the Universal Design for Learning suggests. In this classroom research, I evaluate various SEL strategies that I presented to 15 third-graders during my student teaching. I presented SEL lessons to the full class and collected and analyzed data such as environmental artifacts, classroom observations, and student work in the form of various surveys, email correspondence, and assignment submissions. The relevance of this study reaches beyond the classroom and into the world of child care in general, as Social Emotional Learning acts as the foundational stepping stone in getting children ready to function in the adult world.