Title of Presentation

Crossing the Subjects: History and Writing in the Classroom

Type of Submission

Pre-recorded Poster

Research Field

Educational Studies, History

Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85138860792?pwd=VVFMcEJuenBhcUt2K1QvSVhBZmU1UT09

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2021

Start Date

10-4-2021 9:40 AM

End Date

10-4-2021 9:45 AM

Abstract

Educators who push for the introduction of differing subjects or interdisciplinary work into their classroom argue that the incorporation of a second topic into their classroom helps facilitate different avenues of learning for students. Backed up by the teachings from Dawn Shepherd, Heidi Estrem, and Beth Brunk-Chaves, the incorporation of writing into classrooms allowed for students to have a greater opportunity for retention of new information. In this classroom research study, I examine the incorporation of english writing methods into two Freshman level World History classes, focusing specifically on the usage of writing in formative assessments helping with the summative assessments at the end of an unit. Educators can greatly benefit from this study as the findings show that the incorporation of a secondary discipline into the classroom can help with students expressing themselves and their knowledge of the subject in more ways rather than in just a traditional manner.

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Apr 10th, 9:40 AM Apr 10th, 9:45 AM

Crossing the Subjects: History and Writing in the Classroom

Educators who push for the introduction of differing subjects or interdisciplinary work into their classroom argue that the incorporation of a second topic into their classroom helps facilitate different avenues of learning for students. Backed up by the teachings from Dawn Shepherd, Heidi Estrem, and Beth Brunk-Chaves, the incorporation of writing into classrooms allowed for students to have a greater opportunity for retention of new information. In this classroom research study, I examine the incorporation of english writing methods into two Freshman level World History classes, focusing specifically on the usage of writing in formative assessments helping with the summative assessments at the end of an unit. Educators can greatly benefit from this study as the findings show that the incorporation of a secondary discipline into the classroom can help with students expressing themselves and their knowledge of the subject in more ways rather than in just a traditional manner.