Title of Presentation

Effects of Student Check-Ins

Type of Submission

Synchronous Research Talk

Research Field

Educational Studies

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2021

Start Date

10-4-2021 10:30 AM

End Date

10-4-2021 10:45 AM

Abstract

At the secondary level, especially in a virtual setting, checking in with students to gauge their thoughts and emotions, provide individual commentary on work, and ask for student feedback on instruction based on their personal learning needs benefits both the students and the teacher by creating a positive learning environment. Lee (2012) states that, “a supportive teacher-student relationship was positively related to social self-concept, school adjustment, and grade” (p. 331). This teacher research discusses the effects of multimodal student check-ins on relationship building within the classroom. Data was collected through field notes, surveys, and student journaling with teacher response. The results of this study suggest that student check-ins affect students and teachers positively by providing students a chance to express their opinions with their teacher about how they are learning, what may be going on outside of the classroom that could impact their work or attendance, as well as more individualized feedback with attention to detail. Findings from this study are significant for education because the implementation varying styles of check-ins with students has different benefits, but they all allow for a response to student feedback, work, and thoughts.

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Apr 10th, 10:30 AM Apr 10th, 10:45 AM

Effects of Student Check-Ins

At the secondary level, especially in a virtual setting, checking in with students to gauge their thoughts and emotions, provide individual commentary on work, and ask for student feedback on instruction based on their personal learning needs benefits both the students and the teacher by creating a positive learning environment. Lee (2012) states that, “a supportive teacher-student relationship was positively related to social self-concept, school adjustment, and grade” (p. 331). This teacher research discusses the effects of multimodal student check-ins on relationship building within the classroom. Data was collected through field notes, surveys, and student journaling with teacher response. The results of this study suggest that student check-ins affect students and teachers positively by providing students a chance to express their opinions with their teacher about how they are learning, what may be going on outside of the classroom that could impact their work or attendance, as well as more individualized feedback with attention to detail. Findings from this study are significant for education because the implementation varying styles of check-ins with students has different benefits, but they all allow for a response to student feedback, work, and thoughts.