Title of Presentation

Equity Lessons From Alternative Education

Type of Submission

Synchronous Research Talk

Research Field

Educational Studies

Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85138860792?pwd=VVFMcEJuenBhcUt2K1QvSVhBZmU1UT09

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2021

Start Date

10-4-2021 10:15 AM

End Date

10-4-2021 10:30 AM

Abstract

The field of education is marked by a need for constant reform; as society changes, so must learning environments. However, research has shown that traditional schools in the United States have not changed significantly since the Industrial Age, retaining practices that are harmful to specific groups of students (Aslan, Reigeluth, & Thomas, 2014; Deshler, 1978; Scott, 2017). This research synthesis examines the common practices in traditional education that are detrimental to marginalized students and how the best practices of alternative education can remedy those effects. For the purposes of this study, “marginalized” refers to BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color) students as well as students with learning disabilities. “Alternative education” refers to the type of education that employs a constructivist and humanistic approach which creates a more equitable environment for all students (Kraftl, 2014). To examine the research question, the three major areas explored were a) the specific downfalls of traditional education, b) the benefits alternative education can provide to marginalized students, and c) the specific practices from alternative education that can be implemented in all schools. Evidence shows that the traditional school system can be harmful due to its outdated, racist, and ableist origins, and that alternative practices are more focused on students’ well-being (De La Ossa, 2005; Afacan, Justin, Lequia, Perzigian, & Wilkerson, 2016)). This research synthesis aims to educate and mobilize teachers, parents, and students alike to create real, long-lasting change in the educational system in order to make it a more equitable environment.

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Apr 10th, 10:15 AM Apr 10th, 10:30 AM

Equity Lessons From Alternative Education

The field of education is marked by a need for constant reform; as society changes, so must learning environments. However, research has shown that traditional schools in the United States have not changed significantly since the Industrial Age, retaining practices that are harmful to specific groups of students (Aslan, Reigeluth, & Thomas, 2014; Deshler, 1978; Scott, 2017). This research synthesis examines the common practices in traditional education that are detrimental to marginalized students and how the best practices of alternative education can remedy those effects. For the purposes of this study, “marginalized” refers to BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color) students as well as students with learning disabilities. “Alternative education” refers to the type of education that employs a constructivist and humanistic approach which creates a more equitable environment for all students (Kraftl, 2014). To examine the research question, the three major areas explored were a) the specific downfalls of traditional education, b) the benefits alternative education can provide to marginalized students, and c) the specific practices from alternative education that can be implemented in all schools. Evidence shows that the traditional school system can be harmful due to its outdated, racist, and ableist origins, and that alternative practices are more focused on students’ well-being (De La Ossa, 2005; Afacan, Justin, Lequia, Perzigian, & Wilkerson, 2016)). This research synthesis aims to educate and mobilize teachers, parents, and students alike to create real, long-lasting change in the educational system in order to make it a more equitable environment.