Title of Presentation

Understanding Information Engines

Type of Submission

Synchronous Research Talk

Research Field

Physics

Faculty Advisor

Gabriel Spalding

Graduation Year

2022

Start Date

11-4-2021 2:00 PM

End Date

11-4-2021 3:00 PM

Abstract

Title: Understanding the capabilities of information engines

Our information engine will consist of an optical trap that holds a nanoparticle in water, well away from any physical boundaries. The optical forces constitute a holographic environment, real to the particle, but programmable by us. In this environment which we can modify, the particle is governed by brownian mechanics, but by creating a feedback loop that makes use of information about the particle’s upward motion, we can develop an engine that can store gravitational potential energy extracted from information on the particle's position. Information engines are heat engines that create work by consuming the information of a thermodynamic system, allowing for efficiencies unaccounted for by the classical second law of thermodynamics. Studying information engines is important for testing both differential fluctuation theorems and fluctuation theorems more generally. Exploring the limitations of this type of engine can pave the way for a robust understanding of the relationship between information and energy.

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Apr 11th, 2:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

Understanding Information Engines

Title: Understanding the capabilities of information engines

Our information engine will consist of an optical trap that holds a nanoparticle in water, well away from any physical boundaries. The optical forces constitute a holographic environment, real to the particle, but programmable by us. In this environment which we can modify, the particle is governed by brownian mechanics, but by creating a feedback loop that makes use of information about the particle’s upward motion, we can develop an engine that can store gravitational potential energy extracted from information on the particle's position. Information engines are heat engines that create work by consuming the information of a thermodynamic system, allowing for efficiencies unaccounted for by the classical second law of thermodynamics. Studying information engines is important for testing both differential fluctuation theorems and fluctuation theorems more generally. Exploring the limitations of this type of engine can pave the way for a robust understanding of the relationship between information and energy.