Title of Presentation or Performance

Simulating Crystallography with Programmable Spatial Light Modulator Devices

Major

Physics

Type of Submission

Poster

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Area of Study or Work

Physics

Expected Graduation Date

2024

Location

CNS Atrium, Easel 36

Start Date

4-9-2022 11:15 AM

End Date

4-9-2022 12:30 PM

Abstract

Crystallography has been an immensely important tool in making discoveries about the micro-world of atoms and molecules and materials, which in turn strengthens our understanding about the useful properties of the matter around us. In diffraction experiments, an input beam is scattered by a crystal, into a pattern that, far away, corresponds to a Fourier transform of a 2D slice of the three-dimensional map of particle positions within the sample, mapping the special frequencies present into a “reciprocal space.” Exploration of such mappings can be accomplished using visible laser diffraction (instead of, say, x-ray diffraction) from a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) device. Because the SLM provides a programmable diffractive target, we can use it to encode tailor-made crystal structures, as viewed from user-specified angles, such that the user can experimentally explore the corresponding reciprocal space patterns. Our efforts include porting the experimental modules that we develop, from our initial implementation using commercially available SLMs, to inexpensively available (surplus) liquid-crystal display (LCD) technology.

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Apr 9th, 11:15 AM Apr 9th, 12:30 PM

Simulating Crystallography with Programmable Spatial Light Modulator Devices

CNS Atrium, Easel 36

Crystallography has been an immensely important tool in making discoveries about the micro-world of atoms and molecules and materials, which in turn strengthens our understanding about the useful properties of the matter around us. In diffraction experiments, an input beam is scattered by a crystal, into a pattern that, far away, corresponds to a Fourier transform of a 2D slice of the three-dimensional map of particle positions within the sample, mapping the special frequencies present into a “reciprocal space.” Exploration of such mappings can be accomplished using visible laser diffraction (instead of, say, x-ray diffraction) from a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) device. Because the SLM provides a programmable diffractive target, we can use it to encode tailor-made crystal structures, as viewed from user-specified angles, such that the user can experimentally explore the corresponding reciprocal space patterns. Our efforts include porting the experimental modules that we develop, from our initial implementation using commercially available SLMs, to inexpensively available (surplus) liquid-crystal display (LCD) technology.