Title of Presentation or Performance

Accurate Methods in Pulse Rate Assessment by Palpation: Pilot Study

Major

Nursing, BSN

Type of Submission

Oral Presentation

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Area of Study or Work

Nursing

Expected Graduation Date

2022

Location

CNS E 103

Start Date

4-9-2022 11:15 AM

End Date

4-9-2022 12:15 PM

Abstract

A person’s pulse rate, which provides key data regarding physical and psychological health, must be assessed using a method that is both reliable and valid. Typically, health care providers count the palpated radial pulse for 15, 30, or 60 seconds and then multiply to achieve pulse rate in beats per minute. Although there are studies that focus on the accuracy of pulse rate based on counting interval, there is no gold standard for manual palpation. Additionally, pulse rate findings may vary based on starting the pulse count with either “zero” or “one.” Some researchers have shown more accuracy when starting the count with “zero,” but the common practice has continued to be starting the count with “one.” The purpose of this study is to serve as a pilot for pulse count method validation, specifically examining the effect of counting interval (15, 30, or 60 seconds), and comparing accuracy of pulse count started on “zero” versus “one.” For each participant, the researchers will palpate a radial pulse while counting for different time intervals, with an electrocardiogram serving as the gold standard comparison. Since pulse rate can vary substantially based on age, activity, health state, and other factors, the researchers will also assess participants’ pulses at rest and again when their pulse rate is faster; participants will ride a stationary bike until achieving their target heart rate for exercise. Through use of different counting intervals and interval start points (“zero” versus “one”), the researchers anticipate identifying methods of assessment that are most accurate across a wide range of pulse rates. This pilot study will enroll healthy young adults but pave the way for future research on accurate pulse rate assessment across age groups and disease states.

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Apr 9th, 11:15 AM Apr 9th, 12:15 PM

Accurate Methods in Pulse Rate Assessment by Palpation: Pilot Study

CNS E 103

A person’s pulse rate, which provides key data regarding physical and psychological health, must be assessed using a method that is both reliable and valid. Typically, health care providers count the palpated radial pulse for 15, 30, or 60 seconds and then multiply to achieve pulse rate in beats per minute. Although there are studies that focus on the accuracy of pulse rate based on counting interval, there is no gold standard for manual palpation. Additionally, pulse rate findings may vary based on starting the pulse count with either “zero” or “one.” Some researchers have shown more accuracy when starting the count with “zero,” but the common practice has continued to be starting the count with “one.” The purpose of this study is to serve as a pilot for pulse count method validation, specifically examining the effect of counting interval (15, 30, or 60 seconds), and comparing accuracy of pulse count started on “zero” versus “one.” For each participant, the researchers will palpate a radial pulse while counting for different time intervals, with an electrocardiogram serving as the gold standard comparison. Since pulse rate can vary substantially based on age, activity, health state, and other factors, the researchers will also assess participants’ pulses at rest and again when their pulse rate is faster; participants will ride a stationary bike until achieving their target heart rate for exercise. Through use of different counting intervals and interval start points (“zero” versus “one”), the researchers anticipate identifying methods of assessment that are most accurate across a wide range of pulse rates. This pilot study will enroll healthy young adults but pave the way for future research on accurate pulse rate assessment across age groups and disease states.