Title of Presentation or Performance

Phenotypic variation and new distributional records of the rain frog Pristimantis bipunctatus (Duellman and Hedges, 2005) from Peru

Major

Anthropology

Type of Submission

Poster

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Area of Study or Work

Biology

Expected Graduation Date

2023

Location

CNS Atrium, Easel 20

Start Date

4-9-2022 11:15 AM

End Date

4-9-2022 12:30 PM

Abstract

The genus Pristimantis contains 587 species which are distributed from eastern Honduras, south through Bolivia and east through Brazil. The high species diversity, wide distributional range, high phenotypic variation, and presence of cryptic species make them oftentimes difficult to classify. There are 147 known species of Pristimantis within Peru. One of them is P. bipunctatus, a species that is currently not well known. This species was originally described in 2005 based on a single adult female specimen obtained from the Cordillera Yanachaga in central Peru at 2120 meters above sea level. A series of 15 specimens collected by Lehr and colleagues between 2011 and 2014 in central Peru between 1550 and 2230 m elevation above sea level is the basis for this project. We present new distributional records, phenotypic variation (snout-vent lengths, morphological characters, and coloration variation) for adult males and females. We also highlight a previously unrecognized character, two minute snout tubercles.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 9th, 11:15 AM Apr 9th, 12:30 PM

Phenotypic variation and new distributional records of the rain frog Pristimantis bipunctatus (Duellman and Hedges, 2005) from Peru

CNS Atrium, Easel 20

The genus Pristimantis contains 587 species which are distributed from eastern Honduras, south through Bolivia and east through Brazil. The high species diversity, wide distributional range, high phenotypic variation, and presence of cryptic species make them oftentimes difficult to classify. There are 147 known species of Pristimantis within Peru. One of them is P. bipunctatus, a species that is currently not well known. This species was originally described in 2005 based on a single adult female specimen obtained from the Cordillera Yanachaga in central Peru at 2120 meters above sea level. A series of 15 specimens collected by Lehr and colleagues between 2011 and 2014 in central Peru between 1550 and 2230 m elevation above sea level is the basis for this project. We present new distributional records, phenotypic variation (snout-vent lengths, morphological characters, and coloration variation) for adult males and females. We also highlight a previously unrecognized character, two minute snout tubercles.