Title of Presentation or Performance

Educational Impact on Theatrical Representation of Dis/Abiliity

Major

Educational Studies

Type of Submission

Oral Presentation

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Area of Study or Work

Educational Studies, Theatre Arts

Expected Graduation Date

2022

Location

1st floor, State Farm Hall

Start Date

4-9-2022 9:05 AM

End Date

4-9-2022 9:50 AM

Abstract

Accommodation and inclusivity of individuals with dis/abilities have been increasingly incorporated into the classroom and onto the stage in recent years. In a classroom, this is a highly beneficial change in order to ensure the academic and social success of all students (Baglieri & Shapiro, 2012). The movement in education towards the inclusion of students with dis/abilities is also at the forefront of academic theatrical research and its application. Complementing these movements is teachers’ practice of providing students multiple methods of instruction and assessment so that students’ understanding is more accurately captured (CAST, 2018). This practice, referred to as Universal Design for Learning (UDL) structures three major categories to facilitate multiple means of engagement: representation, action, and expression. These categories are paralleled in theatre, as we see representation through actor training, action through casting practices, and expression through audience response. This research synthesis argues that by utilizing the three categories of UDL as a guide for instructional methods and content in theatre education classrooms and general education classrooms, we can change how we teach students with dis/abilities, and how we teach about dis/abilities in order to more accurately represent those who identify as dis/abled in the theater which will eventually normalize dis/ability in our daily lives. Changing theatrical instruction to be more inclusive of individuals with varying abilities has the potential to positively impact the industry of professional theatre and beyond.

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Apr 9th, 9:05 AM Apr 9th, 9:50 AM

Educational Impact on Theatrical Representation of Dis/Abiliity

1st floor, State Farm Hall

Accommodation and inclusivity of individuals with dis/abilities have been increasingly incorporated into the classroom and onto the stage in recent years. In a classroom, this is a highly beneficial change in order to ensure the academic and social success of all students (Baglieri & Shapiro, 2012). The movement in education towards the inclusion of students with dis/abilities is also at the forefront of academic theatrical research and its application. Complementing these movements is teachers’ practice of providing students multiple methods of instruction and assessment so that students’ understanding is more accurately captured (CAST, 2018). This practice, referred to as Universal Design for Learning (UDL) structures three major categories to facilitate multiple means of engagement: representation, action, and expression. These categories are paralleled in theatre, as we see representation through actor training, action through casting practices, and expression through audience response. This research synthesis argues that by utilizing the three categories of UDL as a guide for instructional methods and content in theatre education classrooms and general education classrooms, we can change how we teach students with dis/abilities, and how we teach about dis/abilities in order to more accurately represent those who identify as dis/abled in the theater which will eventually normalize dis/ability in our daily lives. Changing theatrical instruction to be more inclusive of individuals with varying abilities has the potential to positively impact the industry of professional theatre and beyond.