Title of Presentation or Performance

Antiviral Properties of Fruit Juices on Bacteriophages

Major

Biology

Type of Submission

Poster

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Area of Study or Work

Biology

Expected Graduation Date

2023

Location

CNS Atrium, Easel 16

Start Date

4-9-2022 11:15 AM

End Date

4-9-2022 12:30 PM

Abstract

Viruses utilize many different mechanisms to infect their hosts and spread through populations. Because of this humans have long sought ways to treat viral infections and develop antiviral medications to stop these parasites or at least alleviate symptoms. Historically, a number of plant chemicals have been shown to have antimicrobial properties that have shown promise for these purposes. Prior to this study, cranberry juice has been demonstrated to be inhibitory for certain viruses. Over the last several years students at Illinois Wesleyan University have amassed a collection of about thirty different bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria. The aim of this research is to examine how widespread the effects of cranberry and other juices are on a variety of these bacteriophages. Bacteriophages from the Illinois Wesleyan University collection were exposed to different fruit juices to see how their replication was affected. The effects of juice on viral replication on a variety of virus types were examined and the results of these experiments will be discussed. This research has contributed to the overall knowledge of antivirals, and provides a new starting point for further research on the antiviral properties of juices.

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Apr 9th, 11:15 AM Apr 9th, 12:30 PM

Antiviral Properties of Fruit Juices on Bacteriophages

CNS Atrium, Easel 16

Viruses utilize many different mechanisms to infect their hosts and spread through populations. Because of this humans have long sought ways to treat viral infections and develop antiviral medications to stop these parasites or at least alleviate symptoms. Historically, a number of plant chemicals have been shown to have antimicrobial properties that have shown promise for these purposes. Prior to this study, cranberry juice has been demonstrated to be inhibitory for certain viruses. Over the last several years students at Illinois Wesleyan University have amassed a collection of about thirty different bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria. The aim of this research is to examine how widespread the effects of cranberry and other juices are on a variety of these bacteriophages. Bacteriophages from the Illinois Wesleyan University collection were exposed to different fruit juices to see how their replication was affected. The effects of juice on viral replication on a variety of virus types were examined and the results of these experiments will be discussed. This research has contributed to the overall knowledge of antivirals, and provides a new starting point for further research on the antiviral properties of juices.