Title of Presentation or Performance

Investigating Scarless Tissue Regeneration in Embryonic Wounded Chick Corneas

Major

Biology

Type of Submission

Poster

Type of Submission (Archival)

Event

Area of Study or Work

Biology

Expected Graduation Date

2022

Location

CNS Atrium, Easel 13

Start Date

4-9-2022 8:30 AM

End Date

4-9-2022 9:45 AM

Abstract

Chick embryonic corneal wounds display a remarkable capacity to fully and rapidly regenerate. Whereas adult, wounded corneas experience a loss of transparency due to fibrotic scarring, the tissue integrity of wounded embryonic corneas is intrinsically restored with no detectable scar formation. Given its accessibility and ease of manipulation, the chick embryo is an ideal model for studying scarless corneal wound repair. This video demonstrates the different steps involved in wounding the cornea of an embryonic chick in ovo. First, eggs are windowed at early embryonic ages to facilitate access to the embryonic eye. Second, a series of in ovo physical manipulations to the extraembryonic membranes are conducted to ensure access to the eye is maintained through later stages of development corresponding to when the three cellular layers of the cornea are formed. Third, linear cornea wounds that penetrate the outer epithelial layer and the anterior stroma are made using a microsurgical knife. Following the wounding procedure, regenerating or fully restored corneas can be analyzed for regenerative potential using a variety of cellular and molecular techniques. Studies to date using this model reveal that wounded embryonic corneas display activation of keratocyte differentiation, undergo coordinated remodeling of ECM proteins to their native three-dimensional microstructure, and become properly re-innervated by corneal sensory nerves. Looking ahead, the potential impact of endogenous or exogenous factors on the regenerative process could be analyzed in healing corneas by using developmental biology techniques, such as tissue grafting, electroporation, retroviral infection, or bead implantation. This technique now positions the embryonic chick as an important experimental paradigm for elucidating the molecular and cellular factors that coordinate scarless corneal wound healing.

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Apr 9th, 8:30 AM Apr 9th, 9:45 AM

Investigating Scarless Tissue Regeneration in Embryonic Wounded Chick Corneas

CNS Atrium, Easel 13

Chick embryonic corneal wounds display a remarkable capacity to fully and rapidly regenerate. Whereas adult, wounded corneas experience a loss of transparency due to fibrotic scarring, the tissue integrity of wounded embryonic corneas is intrinsically restored with no detectable scar formation. Given its accessibility and ease of manipulation, the chick embryo is an ideal model for studying scarless corneal wound repair. This video demonstrates the different steps involved in wounding the cornea of an embryonic chick in ovo. First, eggs are windowed at early embryonic ages to facilitate access to the embryonic eye. Second, a series of in ovo physical manipulations to the extraembryonic membranes are conducted to ensure access to the eye is maintained through later stages of development corresponding to when the three cellular layers of the cornea are formed. Third, linear cornea wounds that penetrate the outer epithelial layer and the anterior stroma are made using a microsurgical knife. Following the wounding procedure, regenerating or fully restored corneas can be analyzed for regenerative potential using a variety of cellular and molecular techniques. Studies to date using this model reveal that wounded embryonic corneas display activation of keratocyte differentiation, undergo coordinated remodeling of ECM proteins to their native three-dimensional microstructure, and become properly re-innervated by corneal sensory nerves. Looking ahead, the potential impact of endogenous or exogenous factors on the regenerative process could be analyzed in healing corneas by using developmental biology techniques, such as tissue grafting, electroporation, retroviral infection, or bead implantation. This technique now positions the embryonic chick as an important experimental paradigm for elucidating the molecular and cellular factors that coordinate scarless corneal wound healing.