Event Title

Quantification of the Antioxidant Activity of Wine Polyphenols

Faculty Advisor

Manori Perera

Graduation Year

2018

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2018 3:00 PM

Description

Many of the primary and secondary metabolites produced by plants are polyphenols. When consumed, these polyphenols have been shown to offer many health benefits. These polyphenols are often called antioxidants and are especially abundant in natural products such as tea and wine. While we have studied both beverages, this work focuses on the polyphenols commonly found in wine. This study utilizes differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and the ABTS system to elucidate how the radical scavenging ability of wine polyphenols correlate to the number of polyphenols in solution. The ability of polyphenols to function as antioxidants depends heavily on the pH of the solution. As wine is aged, several biotic and abiotic factors increase the pH from around 3.5 to 4.0, depending on the length of storage. Our current work quantifies how these aging related changes in pH effect the ability of polyphenols to scavenge radicals. Since we have previously studied tea, we also plan to compare tea to wine to elucidate would be a more effective source of antioxidants.

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

Quantification of the Antioxidant Activity of Wine Polyphenols

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Many of the primary and secondary metabolites produced by plants are polyphenols. When consumed, these polyphenols have been shown to offer many health benefits. These polyphenols are often called antioxidants and are especially abundant in natural products such as tea and wine. While we have studied both beverages, this work focuses on the polyphenols commonly found in wine. This study utilizes differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and the ABTS system to elucidate how the radical scavenging ability of wine polyphenols correlate to the number of polyphenols in solution. The ability of polyphenols to function as antioxidants depends heavily on the pH of the solution. As wine is aged, several biotic and abiotic factors increase the pH from around 3.5 to 4.0, depending on the length of storage. Our current work quantifies how these aging related changes in pH effect the ability of polyphenols to scavenge radicals. Since we have previously studied tea, we also plan to compare tea to wine to elucidate would be a more effective source of antioxidants.