Faculty Advisor

Thushara Perera

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2018 3:00 PM

Description

The Electroencephalogram (EEG), which is used to effectively record brain waves, has long been a key pillar of sleep research. However, sleep research has an important problem–the natural environment in which people sleep (their bedrooms), is not where sleep research is conducted. Several companies have released EEG headsets to try and address this problem, however, there are still many obstacles to home use. Such headsets are too expensive to be used by everyone and are still not effective enough to be utilized by physicians performing sleep studies. The goal of our research is to find affordable and innovative ways to improve on current EEG technology, mainly utilizing active electrodes. Active electrodes are a newer direction in EEG technology. They allow the brain potentials to be amplified at the electrode site, enabling better noise retransmission (and eventual reduction), while also providing more effective pick-up of bio-potentials without using conductive gel. To this end, we designed a useable EEG prototype using inexpensive circuit components, and digitized the signal from that circuit using LabVIEW. Our preliminary data indicates that not only is this affordable EEG technology viable, but that the circuit design naturally lends itself to being miniaturized into an ergonomically good electrode––our next step on this path towards affordable and accessible EEG technology.

Included in

Physics Commons

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

In Pursuit Of A Good Night’s Rest. Steps Towards Improving Electroencephalogram (Eeg) Accessibility And Affordability

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

The Electroencephalogram (EEG), which is used to effectively record brain waves, has long been a key pillar of sleep research. However, sleep research has an important problem–the natural environment in which people sleep (their bedrooms), is not where sleep research is conducted. Several companies have released EEG headsets to try and address this problem, however, there are still many obstacles to home use. Such headsets are too expensive to be used by everyone and are still not effective enough to be utilized by physicians performing sleep studies. The goal of our research is to find affordable and innovative ways to improve on current EEG technology, mainly utilizing active electrodes. Active electrodes are a newer direction in EEG technology. They allow the brain potentials to be amplified at the electrode site, enabling better noise retransmission (and eventual reduction), while also providing more effective pick-up of bio-potentials without using conductive gel. To this end, we designed a useable EEG prototype using inexpensive circuit components, and digitized the signal from that circuit using LabVIEW. Our preliminary data indicates that not only is this affordable EEG technology viable, but that the circuit design naturally lends itself to being miniaturized into an ergonomically good electrode––our next step on this path towards affordable and accessible EEG technology.