Event Title

The Power of Arts: Contribution of Arts-based Education on Children's Learning in the Early Years

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Foyer, State Farm Hall, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2019 10:00 AM

Description

The significance of the use of arts in children’s educational contexts is well-demonstrated and the value of arts-based education had been highlighted in recent years (Eisner, 1990; Ewing, 2013; McArdle & Piscitelli, 2002; McArdle & Wright, 2014; Olsson, 2009; Tarr, 2008; Vecchi, 2010; Wright, 2003). The purpose of this paper is to explore how arts-based education supports children’s learning in early years. Using Aistear (NCCA, 2009) as a conceptual framework, this article provides evidence that arts-based education offers young children across different countries great opportunities to enhance learning in terms of their physical and emotional well-being, communication, creativity and cultural belonging. Additionally, it addresses the practical limitations of arts-based education that educators experienced during teaching. Future research should consider an investigation to improve the efficiency of arts-based education, as well as per-service teachers’ training program in arts-based education.

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Apr 13th, 9:00 AM Apr 13th, 10:00 AM

The Power of Arts: Contribution of Arts-based Education on Children's Learning in the Early Years

Foyer, State Farm Hall, Illinois Wesleyan University

The significance of the use of arts in children’s educational contexts is well-demonstrated and the value of arts-based education had been highlighted in recent years (Eisner, 1990; Ewing, 2013; McArdle & Piscitelli, 2002; McArdle & Wright, 2014; Olsson, 2009; Tarr, 2008; Vecchi, 2010; Wright, 2003). The purpose of this paper is to explore how arts-based education supports children’s learning in early years. Using Aistear (NCCA, 2009) as a conceptual framework, this article provides evidence that arts-based education offers young children across different countries great opportunities to enhance learning in terms of their physical and emotional well-being, communication, creativity and cultural belonging. Additionally, it addresses the practical limitations of arts-based education that educators experienced during teaching. Future research should consider an investigation to improve the efficiency of arts-based education, as well as per-service teachers’ training program in arts-based education.