Event Title

The Journey of Discovering Kvothe

Faculty Advisor

Richard Alvey

Graduation Year

2023

Location

Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

4-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 10:00 AM

Description

Over the last 100 years, it was found that there are an estimated 1031 biological entities called bacteriophages or phages that are viruses that infect and kill bacteria. However, there are only a few thousand characterized bacteriophages. That is why it is important to discover new clusters of phages so we have a better knowledge of the abundant group of viruses that could combat bacteria-caused diseases. In this study, we searched for bacteriophages using the host Rhodobacter capsulatus YW1. We used different techniques like phage isolation and DNA extraction to uncover a phage and get it ready for testing. Then, we tested the phage to place it in a cluster by doing lysogen tests, PCR, TEM analysis and DNA sequencing. The phage we discovered, Kvothe was found in Sugar Creek in Bloomington, IL. By looking at its DNA sequence, we discovered that Kvothe belongs to the RcC cluster containing seven other phages with similar DNA. We were also able to see what genes in Kvothe have functions and which functions are still unknown. There is still so much left to learn about bacteriophages. In the future we will strive to discover how phages adapted to become so diverse.

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Apr 4th, 9:00 AM Apr 4th, 10:00 AM

The Journey of Discovering Kvothe

Center for Natural Sciences

Over the last 100 years, it was found that there are an estimated 1031 biological entities called bacteriophages or phages that are viruses that infect and kill bacteria. However, there are only a few thousand characterized bacteriophages. That is why it is important to discover new clusters of phages so we have a better knowledge of the abundant group of viruses that could combat bacteria-caused diseases. In this study, we searched for bacteriophages using the host Rhodobacter capsulatus YW1. We used different techniques like phage isolation and DNA extraction to uncover a phage and get it ready for testing. Then, we tested the phage to place it in a cluster by doing lysogen tests, PCR, TEM analysis and DNA sequencing. The phage we discovered, Kvothe was found in Sugar Creek in Bloomington, IL. By looking at its DNA sequence, we discovered that Kvothe belongs to the RcC cluster containing seven other phages with similar DNA. We were also able to see what genes in Kvothe have functions and which functions are still unknown. There is still so much left to learn about bacteriophages. In the future we will strive to discover how phages adapted to become so diverse.