Event Title

Engaging Underrepresented Students in STEM; A Study in Casting a Wide Net

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2020

Location

Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

4-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 10:00 AM

Description

There is a noticeable trend in students who show initial disinterest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) classes in high school. Of the total college graduates in the U.S., only 3.5% of women graduates will pursue careers in STEM. This is marginal compared to the 1.5% of graduates of color and the 1% of graduates with documented learning disabilities (National Center for Education Statistics, 2014). This research was designed to investigate the potential positive and negative effects on the engagement of underrepresented groups in STEM by integrating student interests into high school science classes. Participants in this research include female students, students of color, and students with learning disabilities. Student engagement is defined as the degree of attention, interest, or passion that students show when they are learning, and can be correlated with grades. Data sources include field notes, anecdotal records, lesson plans, and grade details from consenting students. Data analysis supported by literature review reveals a strong connection between student interest and student engagement. The goal of this research is to provide strategies to create an inclusive classroom and to evaluate and deepen my knowledge of teaching for social justice.

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Apr 4th, 9:00 AM Apr 4th, 10:00 AM

Engaging Underrepresented Students in STEM; A Study in Casting a Wide Net

Center for Natural Sciences

There is a noticeable trend in students who show initial disinterest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) classes in high school. Of the total college graduates in the U.S., only 3.5% of women graduates will pursue careers in STEM. This is marginal compared to the 1.5% of graduates of color and the 1% of graduates with documented learning disabilities (National Center for Education Statistics, 2014). This research was designed to investigate the potential positive and negative effects on the engagement of underrepresented groups in STEM by integrating student interests into high school science classes. Participants in this research include female students, students of color, and students with learning disabilities. Student engagement is defined as the degree of attention, interest, or passion that students show when they are learning, and can be correlated with grades. Data sources include field notes, anecdotal records, lesson plans, and grade details from consenting students. Data analysis supported by literature review reveals a strong connection between student interest and student engagement. The goal of this research is to provide strategies to create an inclusive classroom and to evaluate and deepen my knowledge of teaching for social justice.