Event Title

Creative Community: How Creative Writing Contributes to Student Autonomy

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2020

Location

Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

4-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2020 10:00 AM

Description

The focus of my research is creative writing in the classroom and how it can lead to higher student autonomy. Yi-Lien Yeh and Yu-Ju Lan (2017) they say there are 5 ways they interpret this autonomy: for situations in which they study entirely on their own; for a set of skills which can be learned and applied in self-directed learning; for an inborn capacity which is suppressed by institutional education; for the exercise of learners’ responsibility for their own learning; and for the right of learners to determine the direction of their own learning. Creative Writing is a term that essentially speaks for itself, my definition is simply having students write while giving them the freedom to explore topics they’re interested in. Dove (2018) discussed the challenge of creating writing prompts that produce good writings for an appropriate audience. In the English classroom, I was able to experiment a lot with writing prompts and collected data in the form of field notes, student journals, lesson plans, rubrics, and student work samples. Through this study, I found a significant growth in autonomy and learning through the use of creative writing.

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Apr 4th, 9:00 AM Apr 4th, 10:00 AM

Creative Community: How Creative Writing Contributes to Student Autonomy

Center for Natural Sciences

The focus of my research is creative writing in the classroom and how it can lead to higher student autonomy. Yi-Lien Yeh and Yu-Ju Lan (2017) they say there are 5 ways they interpret this autonomy: for situations in which they study entirely on their own; for a set of skills which can be learned and applied in self-directed learning; for an inborn capacity which is suppressed by institutional education; for the exercise of learners’ responsibility for their own learning; and for the right of learners to determine the direction of their own learning. Creative Writing is a term that essentially speaks for itself, my definition is simply having students write while giving them the freedom to explore topics they’re interested in. Dove (2018) discussed the challenge of creating writing prompts that produce good writings for an appropriate audience. In the English classroom, I was able to experiment a lot with writing prompts and collected data in the form of field notes, student journals, lesson plans, rubrics, and student work samples. Through this study, I found a significant growth in autonomy and learning through the use of creative writing.