Event Title

The Salt of Our Tears: Journalism as a Form of Justice

Faculty Advisor

Carmela Ferradans

Graduation Year

2020

Location

Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

4-4-2020 2:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2020 3:00 PM

Description

On November 1, 1988, photojournalist Ildefonso Sena stood on the shores of Tarifa, Spain and captured a photograph of a dead man lying on the sand. In this moment, Sena documented the first migrant who died crossing the Strait of Gibraltar, the 14 km body of water that separates Spain from Africa, which also serves as the clandestine route for many migrants. Thirty years later, this problem persists, as the Mediterranean Sea has borne witness to the increasing number of migrant deaths across the Strait. This project analyzes the ways in which the Spanish media’s representation of migration influences Spaniards’ attitudes of migrants. In an era where the media has the ability to not only represent but also manipulate reality, it is important to consider the ways in which the Spanish media represents the reality of social phenomena such as immigration.

This project analyzes how two national Spanish newspapers have evolved in their portrayal of African migrants from the 1990s to present day. The analysis is multimodal, and takes into consideration how migrants are represented both in written news articles as well as in photographs that accompany the articles.

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Apr 4th, 2:00 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

The Salt of Our Tears: Journalism as a Form of Justice

Center for Natural Sciences

On November 1, 1988, photojournalist Ildefonso Sena stood on the shores of Tarifa, Spain and captured a photograph of a dead man lying on the sand. In this moment, Sena documented the first migrant who died crossing the Strait of Gibraltar, the 14 km body of water that separates Spain from Africa, which also serves as the clandestine route for many migrants. Thirty years later, this problem persists, as the Mediterranean Sea has borne witness to the increasing number of migrant deaths across the Strait. This project analyzes the ways in which the Spanish media’s representation of migration influences Spaniards’ attitudes of migrants. In an era where the media has the ability to not only represent but also manipulate reality, it is important to consider the ways in which the Spanish media represents the reality of social phenomena such as immigration.

This project analyzes how two national Spanish newspapers have evolved in their portrayal of African migrants from the 1990s to present day. The analysis is multimodal, and takes into consideration how migrants are represented both in written news articles as well as in photographs that accompany the articles.